Home » Uncategorized » Leadership Guided by Vision

Leadership Guided by Vision

Over the last four weeks we featured nine of Richard Voreis’ 15 “Leadership Best Practices Self-Evaluation.”

The first nine leadership traits we looked at were:

  • Optimizes productivity without intimidation
  • Represents a role model with a high degree of ethical conduct
  • Demonstrates imaginative Leadership and imparts a vision for the future
  • Excels in training, leading and motivating people
  • Communicates effectively to all employees; especially the values and priorities that drive success
  • In terms of effective communications, is known as an avid listener
  • Balances negatives with positives, not just one or the other
  • Uncompromising in personal “leading by example”
  • Expects great things from themselves, expects same high caliber performance from others and always set high personal standards for others to follow

This week we will focus on Voreis’ next three:

  • Takes responsibility for failure and shares “lesson learned the hard way,” showing people the leader is human and helps them learn by example.
  • Subtly provides guidance by “planting” ideas in the minds of others to motivate success and gives credit to others even when it is the leader’s ideas.
  • Very good at influencing and inspiring people so they believe in themselves and believe they can accomplish challenging tasks.

As I write this week I’m just coming off Glass Doctor’s annual reunion. This year, 1,700 Dwyer Group “family members” met in San Antonio. There we awarded our annual Glass Doctor yearly awards—including Franchisee of the Year and leadership awards, as well as top tech and others top franchise employees.

  • Takes responsibility for failure and shares “lesson learned the hard way” showing people the leader is human and helps them learn by example.

One of the coolest things about the franchise world is that franchisees are willing sharing with each other their successes, as well as their failures. For more than 30 years I’ve seen numerous examples of this peer mentoring.

Humble people are always much more willing to share the “lessons learned the hard way.”

As I drove home from the Austin airport Sunday evening I heard an interview on NPR with David Letterman. He discussed how he felt, in his younger days, that he should be a writer for the Mary Tyler Moore show and change its “formula.” He quickly learned that shows such as that had a very successful template that no one should try and improve. It is the reason they are #1 shows.

This reminded me of a conversation I had with our Franchisee of the Year, Justin Eimers, from Sioux Falls, S.D. Justin started out as an independent “one-man band” working out of the cab of his pick-up truck for many years. A relative told him that “you can’t trust people” and he would be better off working without any employees.

When he joined us he found that just wasn’t the case. His growth and success came when he “followed our formula” and grew to where he is today. He learned the hard way for many years.

  • Subtly provides guidance by “planting” ideas in the minds of others to motivate success and gives credit to other even when it is the leader’s ideas.

Matt Kelly, Glass Doctor franchisee in Columbus and Cleveland, is living proof of this. Award winners at his office include our Technician of the Year, Office Professional of the Year and Woman of the Year. Each of the employees gave props to Matt and thanks to him for working in his organization.

Matt received our President’s Award and was quick to point to his employees for his success.

I know Matt well. He is the vice chair of our leadership council so I am involved with him on many projects. I understand well how Matt’s mind works. He is excellent at having vision. One of our speakers for our event, in fact one of my favorite speakers on the planet, Walter Bond, talked about how some people have sight and others have vision. Matt has vision.

The best example of this is with Glass Doctor’s Office Professional of the Year—Misty Delong. While pursuing her master’s in accounting, Misty worked as a teller at a local bank and met Matt. He convinced her to leave the bank and join Glass Doctor in a part-time, paid intern position. Eventually she went to full-time and is today the go-to person in Matt’s operation. She caught his vision and took it to the next level in the operation.

Because he has vision he is a master at planting great ideas to help motivate others.

  • Very good at influencing and inspiring people so they believe in themselves and believe they can accomplish challenging tasks.

Go back in your memory bank and remember the time that someone told you that you could accomplish something. Was it a parent? A coach? Was it a boss that changed your career? A best friend?

Do yourself a favor and get a glimpse of what I we saw last week with our keynote, Walter Bond. Click on this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_LsoYOXzGw. This is a 42-minute speech to the FFA. Watch the segment from 24 minutes into the video to 32:10.  It is eight minutes but you’ll get a much better understanding of this leadership practice. No doubt you’ll want to watch all 42 minutes!

Next week I’ll reveal the final three best leadership practices from Richard Voreis.

Posted in Uncategorized

Comments are closed.